Manual Essential Foot Care for Diabetics ((Foot Care For You Series From The Foot Care Centre) Book 1)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Essential Foot Care for Diabetics ((Foot Care For You Series From The Foot Care Centre) Book 1) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Essential Foot Care for Diabetics ((Foot Care For You Series From The Foot Care Centre) Book 1) book. Happy reading Essential Foot Care for Diabetics ((Foot Care For You Series From The Foot Care Centre) Book 1) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Essential Foot Care for Diabetics ((Foot Care For You Series From The Foot Care Centre) Book 1) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Essential Foot Care for Diabetics ((Foot Care For You Series From The Foot Care Centre) Book 1) Pocket Guide.

Diabetic patients usually have their fasting blood glucose checked in the laboratory prior to consultation.


  • From Both Sides: A Look into the World of Foster Care from Those Who Know It Best;
  • INTRODUCTION!
  • Foot care tips if you have diabetes;
  • How to look after your feet if you have diabetes - NHS.
  • The Job Journey: Get the Confidence, Get the Job;

Apart from blood glucose, other laboratory tests that may be conducted include full blood count, total serum cholesterol, serum electrolyte and urea and urinalysis. After consultation with a physician, each patient is given an appointment, the length of which depends on the current value of the fasting blood glucose. The respondents included consenting Type 2 diabetes mellitus adult patients being managed at the health centre; newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetic patients were excluded from the study.

Data were analysed using the SPPS v. Frequency distribution of the variables was performed to describe the data and cross-tabulation was conducted to compare variables. Seventy patients Table 1 depicts the age range of the patients in relation to the percentage awareness of foot care measures, while Table 2 shows the duration of diagnosis in relation to the level of awareness of the patients. Daily foot care is essential for preventing complications of diabetic neuropathy and vascular insufficiency. This is much higher than the result obtained from a study conducted among Indian diabetics, which revealed that about Factors responsible for this situation may include the fact that, 1 there are no organised health education sessions prior to consultation, 2 there are no disease-specific clinic days, 3 there is no continuous care for a particular patient by the same physician and 4 a total lack of interest in health education by the physicians for one reason or the other.

A number of the patients who had some knowledge of foot care procedures had obtained this information from the Internet or books.

This significant lack of education on foot care is unacceptable, especially considering the fact that diabetic foot syndrome not only poses serious medical problems, but also has a major socio-economic impact, by virtue of the number of hospital visits and admissions and restriction of mobility with its attendant effect on psychological well-being and quality of life.

Health care teams of institutional health care services, especially at a university level, should endeavour to incorporate foot care education for diabetic patients into their daily practice, in order to prevent or reduce the occurrence of diabetic foot syndrome.

In this study, awareness of foot care measures is very poor among known diabetic patients and this is largely due to a lack of education of the patients by their health care providers. Health care workers particularly physicians should endeavour to give their diabetic patients necessary health education about foot care in order to reduce the burden of foot complications among diabetic patients.

If too busy to give health education, they should at least ensure some other health worker does it.


  • Infanta (German Edition).
  • Dog Behavior: Understanding Dog Body Language!
  • FINI LE CELIBAT! LES MOTS,LE STYLE POUR SEDUIRE SON COEUR-DEVENEZ HEUREUX: Prémices damour sans détour (French Edition)?
  • A Little Book of Time Tips.
  • Piedralén: Historia de un campesino. De Cuba a la Guerra Civil (Estudios) (Spanish Edition)!
  • Teorias e práticas psicológicas aplicadas no contexto de seleção de executivos (Portuguese Edition)!
  • .

National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Published online Oct Rabi I. Ekore , 1 Ikeoluwapo O. Ajayi , 2 Ayo Arije , 3 and John O. Ekore 4.

Ikeoluwapo O. John O. Ekore 4 Dept. Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Corresponding author. Correspondence to: Rabi Ekore, email: ku.

Knowledge of and attitude to foot care amongst Type 2 diabetes patients attending a university-based primary care clinic in Nigeria. DOI: Received Feb 24; Accepted May The Authors. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License.

How to care for your feet if you are diabetic

ABSTRACT Background Individuals living with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of developing foot ulcers and cardiovascular complications or a neuropathy that may result in amputations. Objectives This study was carried out to determine the level of awareness and attitude to foot care among adult diabetic patients attending a university health centre i. Conclusion The results of this study showed that awareness of foot care measures is very poor among known diabetic patients and this is largely due to a lack of education of the patients by their health care providers.

Keywords: attitude, diabetic foot care, education, knowledge, Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

http://matindoor.com/modules/fehysejil/kgb-logiciel-espion.php

Open in a separate window. Morbach S. Find out more about eating healthily and keeping active. Seek treatment from your GP or podiatrist if blisters or injuries don't heal quickly.

Secondary navigation

Diabetes UK has more information on how to look after your feet. Page last reviewed: 26 September Next review due: 26 September How to look after your feet if you have diabetes - Healthy body Secondary navigation Body Bones Food for strong bones Children's bone health Menopause and your bone health Keep your bones strong over 65 Are you at risk of breaking a bone? Are you at risk of falling? Tips on foot care Foot problems and the podiatrist Looking after your feet with diabetes Choosing sports shoes and trainers How to stop smelly feet. Lower your cholesterol Keeping your kidneys healthy Top 10 healthy heart tips.

Common skin conditions Look after your skin Psoriasis: 'Don't suffer in silence' 'I put off pregnancy because of psoriasis' Keloid scars Dangers of black henna. Back pain at work How to sit correctly Posture tips for laptop users How to prevent germs from spreading How to wash your hands Is my child too ill for school?

essential foot care for diabetics foot care for you series from the foot care centre book 1 Manual

Stages of puberty Getting medical care as a student Breast changes in older women Tips to prevent RSI Safe lifting tips 5 causes of premature death. Sexual health guide. Ears Hearing aids 5 ways to prevent hearing loss. Eye safety Look after your eyes Eye health tips for older people Laser eye surgery Low vision explained Contact lens safety.