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The Half-Breed | Silent Film Festival

RG 15, volume described elsewhere serves as a location register for the Dominion lands awarded by the North-West Commissions. The register is organized by scrip number and provides the name of the allottee, name of patentee, land description, acreage, date of patent, and the liber and folio numbers of the Letters Patent issued by the Crown. The land scrip retained by Library and Archives Canada is grouped according to the amount of the scrip i. Finding aid FA will guide researchers to the volume in RG 15 where the note is stored; but to use this finding aid researchers must know the scrip number.

To find the note awarded to a particular claimant when the registration number of the scrip note is unknown, researchers should first refer to the delivery registers RG 15, volumes and , described elsewhere to obtain the scrip note number, and then to finding aid FA to find the RG 15 volume number where the note is stored. Pre-printed receipts were distributed by the Department of the Interior along with money and land scrip.

The receipts were issued to the Minister of the Department and were to be signed by scrip recipients when the notes were delivered into their custody. Since land scrip was only first issued under the Manitoba Supplementary Commission P. They are part of the documentation pertaining to all the Commissions which followed the Manitoba Supplementary Commission, except the last - the Treaty 11 Commission - which made cash settlements only. Each receipt carries a unique number ranging from 1 to 15, The records are maintained by Library and Archives Canada in their numerical order.

Finding aid FA, parts 1 to 16, provides access to the records. Under each receipt number, it gives the volume number within the RG 15 record group; the name of the recipient; the recipient's application status heir, child, etc. In instances when the receipt number is unknown and only the claimant's name is available, researchers should first consult the delivery registers RG 15, volumes and , see description elsewhere. The delivery registers are an alphabetical index to all the recipients of scrip.

Among other things, they will give the number of the receipt signed by each claimant. Researchers can then use this number to find the entry for the receipt in finding aid FA The finding aid, in turn, will give researchers an indication as to which volume in RG 15 should be ordered if they wish to obtain access to the original document.


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A numerically arranged series of subject files created by the Dominion Lands Branch. The records included in this series contain general correspondence and departmental memoranda relating to rulings, policy, and procedures, which governed the operations of the North-West Half-Breed Commissions. The files are numbered sequentially from 1 to 5,, and are listed, in numerical, order in finding aid FA Under each file number, the finding aid gives the volume number, file title, date range, and subject headings.

A copy of the electronic finding aid is available elsewhere in Archives Search. A number of these files still retain file jackets with a red imprint which reads "Commissioner's Office, Winnipeg", and feature a five-digit file number for example, file HB has "" stamped in the spaced for the file number. The series probably originated in Winnipeg and at one time had its own classification system.

When the files were transferred to the Dominion Lands Office in Ottawa, new file jackets, printed in blue and labelled "Dominion Lands Branch", were attached to some of the files, and all were given new file numbers with an "HB" prefix. In some cases, the older red jackets were not replaced, and the "HB" number was simply printed to the side of the original five-digit number.

A number of the HB files were withdrawn from this series, transferred to the Dominion Lands Branch central registry, and re-numbered. Also included in the series are some policy and procedure files, and some reports by various agents of the Department. The files are arranged numerically from HB 7 to HB Finding aid FA is a listing of the files found in the series, giving the file title, interested parties, scrip numbers, and the file's date range, volume number and microfilm reel number.

A copy of this finding aid is available elsewhere in Archives Search. These are the registers referred to in Commissioner Street's report see the hand-written statement, signed by Wm. Street on the inside front cover. The latter will often indicate whether or not the claim was allowed; the place where the claim was received by the Commission; the date on which it was approved; the certificate number; the amount of the award, and the case file number if such was created by the Department.

To use these registers when the claim number is unknown, researchers should refer to one of the claims indexes either RG 15, volume or volume , described elsewhere , both of which are alphabetical listings of all the claimants referred to the North-West Half-Breed Commission under P. Researchers can use either index to find the claim number given to a particular application. This number can then be use to find the entry in one of the claims registers. These indexes are referred to as "Book D" and "Book E" in the final report of the Commission see the hand-written statement, signed by Wm.

Street, on the inside front covers of each book. The indexes are alphabetical listings of all the claimants who appeared before the North-West Commission, chaired by W. Both are organized according to the claimant's last name. Each entry in the index for volume gives only the applicant's claim number, that is, the number applied to each application on its presentation to the Secretary of the Commission. The applications were numbered consecutively from 1 to Researchers can use the claim number as a cross-reference in finding aid FA the finding aid to the applications in RG 15, series D II 8b.

Each entry in volume , on the other hand, gives the names of the claimant's parents; the claimant's date of birth; date when married and name of spouse; the claimant's claim number; and general remarks. The latter often includes references to case files when these were created by the Department as part of its administration of a particular claim. Except in instances when a case file was created, the applications associated with each of the entries in this index are filed in RG 15, series D II 8b see description elsewhere. Chalk this up to one of those reads to remind me never to complain about anything I might think is really going wrong in my life.

View 1 comment. It can be hard to read because Maria Campbell really faced one difficulty after another after another I am in awe of the grit and determination she shows in not giving in to despair and in telling her story so honestly. Definitely a book to pass on to everyone you know — an education in Canadian racism against aboriginal peoples. Published in , but let's not kid ourselves that things have changed so drastically regarding the difficulties that Aboriginal people face.

It is vital, then, to actively seek out the narratives who commonly appear only in the media and only as a variant of migrant caricature or brutalized corpse, as my world allows indigenous nations t 3. It is vital, then, to actively seek out the narratives who commonly appear only in the media and only as a variant of migrant caricature or brutalized corpse, as my world allows indigenous nations to appear only as dehumanized hobby or long ago assaulted ancestor, a periphery that, as one is commonly taught in the US, had to die for the sake of the white present day.

I don't know how long we have to go till Campbell's life is no longer the genocidal norm uniquely privy to her kind.

Remembering Who You Are: The Synecdochic Self in Maria Campbell’s “Half-Breed”

That may be part of the point. For me, the most cohesive part of Campbell's life started at the beginning and lasted to just after she married at the age of I later found out that this would have been further shortened had my particular edition not been censored, as my edition does not have the two pages devoted to Campbell's account of being raped at age 14 by members of the RCMP. It'd be easy to sensationalize such for a film, but it only attests to the hoops a young Halfbreed girl is forced to jump through before coming to a sustained way of life, with or without political consciousness, and how easily it is for so many to be wiped out along the way.

So long as that is the case, there will be other Campbell's out there struggling against being hounded to death by the hatred of the Powers That Be of her gender and her kind. As attested to by the author, political work is its own special breed of hell, but as a white person, white, by listening to and amplifying the voices of those who are the experts on their own existence, do I really have to lose? As I continue my way through the yet another work in the Great Books By Women compendium, I am not exactly surprised by the variety, but it does remind me why I haven't yet forsaken this directory as a guide for y reading habits.

Campbell's memoir is no absolute favorite, but it is a window into a world little published by those in the US of A, and so awareness of the kind that uplifts and respects such is vital for any kind of enduring faith in basic human compassion. I learned how swiftly and how fatally one can fall to a system that so brazenly commits theft, rape, and murder, that one becomes a mere object for the movers and pushers of the world one is supposed to appeal to the good will of for the sake of a human life.

I have no doubt that Campbell's story is hardly unique, and the facts of sex work and drug trafficking and heroin addiction are simply that, instead of the sensationalized facet of a best-selling crime thriller or award winning drama. I have a hard time imagining what that will look like, but being unable to come up with a foolproof plan for the humanity of tomorrow is no excuse for not sitting forth to try.

The whites at the meetings were the kind of people who had failed to find recognition among their own people, and so had come to mine, where they were treated with the respect they felt they deserved. Sep 27, Christy rated it liked it Shelves: memoir-and-autobiography , native-american-lit-and-history , readinglist1. Anyone who can read this book and not feel incredibly lucky themselves is either heartless and soulless or living a truly terrible life.

In Half-Breed Maria Campbell, a Halfbreed who grew up in Saskatchewan, describes her childhood and early adulthood, living in poverty, dealing with racism and discrimination, trying to avoid the division of her family at the hands of the government, suffering abuse, turning to prostitution and drugs, and finally getting clean and finding hope in Native pol Wow. In Half-Breed Maria Campbell, a Halfbreed who grew up in Saskatchewan, describes her childhood and early adulthood, living in poverty, dealing with racism and discrimination, trying to avoid the division of her family at the hands of the government, suffering abuse, turning to prostitution and drugs, and finally getting clean and finding hope in Native politics.

Her personal life story is extraordinary and heartbreaking, but the text goes beyond just telling her own story.

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She makes sure to position her memoir in the broader context of Halfbreed history. She opens by describing the way that her people have had to move from place to place as white people and their government settled on their lands, how they eventually tried to work within the Canadian system in order to preserve the land they did have but failed because they could not earn enough money to pay for upkeep, how a major political movement grew up and then died away in the face of divisions among the people.

Campbell's life and the sense of hopelessness and failure most of her family, friends, and neighbors exist within is a direct result of this history. Campbell concludes Half-Breed by looking to the future.


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The political movement she had been involved in becomes another failure, but she continues to believe that one day, and one day soon, things will change.